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Birth Trauma Inquiry

Birth Trauma Inquiry

The findings of the cross-party inquiry into birth trauma are simultaneously horrific, depressing and (hopefully) a wake-up call. Their Report entitled, ‘Listen to Mums: Ending the Postcode Lottery on Perinatal Care’, presents, once again, facts and experiences that have long been familiar to women and to professionals working in maternity care.

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Is Sure Start heading for a re-start?

Is Sure Start heading for a re-start?

If current polling is correct, then the Labour Party will return to power in the UK by early 2025. The last time Labour led the UK Government, one of its most prominent policies was the creation of Sure Start in 1997.

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The Rhythm Method also applies to language development!

The Rhythm Method also applies to language development!

Increasingly sophisticated neurological research is yielding new, and sometimes surprising, insights about the ways in which infants process, understand and begin to use language. 

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Happy 70th Birthday, FIGO!

Happy 70th Birthday, FIGO!

The International Federation of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (FIGO) first convened in Switzerland in 1954 and brought together professional Ob/Gyn societies from 42 nations. FIGO has been collaborating with WHO for nearly as long and has now expanded to 139 countries.

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Feeding and Sleeping: A complex picture

Feeding and Sleeping: A complex picture

Most new parents, especially mothers, lose sleep over how best to feed their baby – and hunger for ways to ensure everyone gets a good night’s sleep.

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Maternal deaths on the rise, but off the radar

Maternal deaths on the rise, but off the radar

The latest research in the UK (Knight et al. on behalf of MBRRACE, 2023) and Sweden (Hagatulah et al., 2024) reveals that the death rate during, and in the weeks following, pregnancy has increased significantly. Although similar data can be found among other ‘First World’ nations, the rate in the UK alone has reached a 20-year high.

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Bilingualism benefits premature children, study finds

Bilingualism benefits premature children, study finds

New research suggests that speaking more than one language could help strengthen executive functioning, a set of skills critical to development and academic success.

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First-time fathers seem to experience a steeper decline in relationship satisfaction in the first two years post-partum than second-time fathers

First-time fathers seem to experience a steeper decline in relationship satisfaction in the first two years post-partum than second-time fathers

First-time fathers seem to experience a steeper decline in relationship satisfaction in the first two years post-partum than second-time fathers, who appear to recover lost relationship satisfaction by the time their second child is 14 months old, according to a study published August 30, 2023 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Judith T. Mack and Lena Brunke from Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, and colleagues.

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Premature birth and co-morbidity in adolescence

Premature birth and co-morbidity in adolescence

A study which linked national registries from Finland and Norway to investigate prematurity and the occurrence of two or more health conditions during adolescence found that earlier gestational age at birth was consistently associated with increasingly complex multi-morbidity in adolescence in a dose–response manner.

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Breast Milk Component Boosts Infant Brain Connectivity

Breast Milk Component Boosts Infant Brain Connectivity

Researchers have discovered that myo-inositol, a small cyclic sugar molecule found in breast milk, plays a crucial role in promoting neuronal connections in infants’ brains.

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Unborn babies use ‘greedy’ gene from dads to ‘remote-control’ mums into feeding them extra food

Unborn babies use ‘greedy’ gene from dads to ‘remote-control’ mums into feeding them extra food

Fetuses use a copy of a gene inherited from their dad to force their mum to release as much nutrients as possible during pregnancy, Cambridge scientists have discovered.

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Poverty negatively impacts structural wiring in children’s brains

Poverty negatively impacts structural wiring in children’s brains

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that growing up in poverty may influence the wiring of a child’s brain.

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