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The International Journal of Birth and Parent Education is a quarterly publication focusing on policy, research and best practice in parent support and education from pregnancy to two.


We know that pregnancy and the first years of parenting are ‘a teachable moment’ when mothers and fathers are exceptionally open to making changes in their lives.
As a reader of the IJBPE, you are someone who wants to make a difference to children’s lives by using your knowledge and skills to educate and support mothers and fathers as they make the transition to parenthood.


Inside the IJBPE, you will find:

• What leading academics across the world are saying about parent education in the very early years
• How health and social care practitioners are translating new knowledge into best practice
• What the policy makers are saying about systems to support and educate new parents and those working with them

The IJBPE is essentially a Journal for professionals who are out there in the community, or who are planning a career working with mothers and fathers in the earliest years of their children’s lives. At the end of each year, the Journal’s 4 issues will have updated you on the latest thinking and the very best practice in parent education and support. You will be inspired to continue to support new mothers and fathers to the best of your ability, in the knowledge that it is parents who shape their children’s futures.

FREE Articles from the IJBPE


These articles are free for you to browse.
They illustrate some of the topics that the Journal covers and the way in which it covers them. We hope you find them interesting, informative and accessible.

Daddy’s Funny Father’s playfulness with young children

Daddy’s Funny Father’s playfulness with young children

Children’s play with fathers can be raucous, vigorous and stimulating.

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Preparing women for home birth

Preparing women for home birth

This article outlines some of the issues involved for women and their partners in deciding whether or not to plan a homebirth.

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Understanding and responding to excessive crying

Understanding and responding to excessive crying

Excessive crying in early infancy is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes for babies and their families.

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 What's in the  Winter Issue - Volume 6 Issue 2
Focus on education and support for parents who lose their baby


EDITORIAL

Losing a baby Changing families for ever
Losing a baby Changing families for ever
Mary Nolan, Editor-in-Chief

GUEST Editorial
The hidden tragedy of stillbirthThe hidden tragedy of stillbirth
Clea Harmer, CEO, Sands UK


GUEST Editorial
Optimal bereavement careOptimal bereavement care
Jackie Mead, CEO, Sands Australia


ARTICLES

Supporting families worldwide who experience a stillbirth
Nomathemba Chandiwana, Wits Reproductive Nomathemba Chandiwana, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute (Wits RHI), Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Salome Maswime, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of the Witwatersrand,Johannesburg,South Africa; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA
Amina Oziwere Jibril, Department of  Paediatrics, University of Abuja and University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, FCT, Nigeria
George Gwako, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nairobi, Kenya
Linda Ahenkorah Fondjo, Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Tino Salome, Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine: Uganda Research Unit
Richard Chawana, Medical Research Council: Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Michael Adeyemi Olamoyegun, Department of Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology and Lautech Teaching Hospital, Osogobo, Nigeria
Nompumelelo Mtshali, Department of Anatomical Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Hannah Blencowe, Maternal Adolescent Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH) Centre, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

The trauma of infant loss
Dorte M. Christiansen, National Center for Psychotraumatology, University of Southern Denmark; Institute of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark


Support and follow up needs of parents after pregnancy loss, stillbirth and neonatal death: Recommendations for practice
Julie Jones, Senior Lecturer, Midwifery, University of West London, UKJulie Jones, Senior Lecturer, Midwifery, University of West London, UK

Care in pregnancies after stillbirth and perinatal death
Alexander E.P. Heazell, Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester; St. Mary’s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK
Alexander E.P. Heazell, Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester; St. Mary’s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK
Aleena Wojciese, NHMRC, Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth, Mater Research Unit – The University of Queensland (MRI-UQ), South Brisbane, Australia
Nicole Graham, Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester; St. Mary’s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK
Louise Stephens, St. Mary’s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust; Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK


PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Returning musicality to parents: Constructing a strategy using parental voiceReturning musicality to parents: Constructing a strategy using parental voice
Helen Shoemark, Associate Professor, Music Therapy, Temple University, Philadelphia, USA


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Institutional Subscribers

If you are a University, hospital, library or other institution and would like to take out a subscription, we have a range of prices dependent on your size and readership.

Up to 300 readers - £180
300-1,200 readers - £250
Over 1,200 readers - £500

Subscriptions are available directly from IJBPE or through EBSCO. Please enquire for further information. Please email us for more details.

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  • Previous Issues
    Volume 1

    Previous IssuesVolume 1
    Issue 2 - Focus on Education for Birth
    Issue 3 - Focus on Fathers
    Issue 4 - Focus on Nuturing and Nutrition
  • Previous Issues
    Volume 2

    Previous IssuesVolume 2
    Issue 1 - Focus on Play
    Issue 2 - Focus on Sleep and Soothing
    Issue 3 - Focus on Parents and Children with Learning Disabilities
    Issue 4 - Focus on Education for Calm Parenting
  • Previous Issues
    Volume 3

    Previous IssuesVolume 3
    Issue 1 - Open Focus

    Issue 2 - Focus on Family Nurse Partnership/ Nurse-Family Partnership

    Issue 3 - Focus on Relationships
    Supplement No.1: AIMH Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) No. 1 ‘Improving Relationships in the Perinatal Period: What Works?’

    Issue 4 - Focus on Preparation and Support for Labour and Birth?
    Supplement: 2016 IJBPE Conference ‘Parent Education Today: Walking the Walk’. Practice Pointers from the Conference Workshops
  • Previous Issues
    Volume 4

    Previous IssuesVolume 4
    Issue 1 - Focus on Attachment
    Supplement No.2: AIMH Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) No. 2 ‘Improving Attachment in Babies: What Works?’

    Issue 2 - Focus on Peer Support

    Issue 3 - Focus on Parenting in Difficult Circumstances
    Supplement No.3: AIMH Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) No. 3 'Antenatal Anxiety and Depression: What Should We Be Doing?'

    Issue 4 - Focus on preconception education, FASD, and prematurity

  • Previous Issues
    Volume 5

    Previous IssuesVolume 5
    Issue 1 - Focus on School Readiness
    Supplement No.3: AIMH Best Practice Guidelines (BPG) No. 3 ‘The Relationship with the Unborn Baby: Why it Matters’

    Issue 2 - Focus on Fostering and Adoption

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